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Everyone we interviewed for these stories knew the exact moment when they realised the impact gender inequality had on their lives. For some, this sudden clarity happened in childhood. Others become clear eyed about the world when they started their first job or had a baby.

A common thread between all of these stories is the readiness with which each person could point to someone they knew who had shown them another way. A person in their life who demonstrated that yes, we can be strong and kind, feminist and proud.

Their stories are woven into our own, strengthening our determination to ensure the future for women & girls is equal. Join us.

Jess

"Mum has always been an avid feminist. She is always pointing out inequalities and encouraging me to be strong and not to take any sh*t."

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Emmanuela

"I aspire to make the most of my life while remaining respectful to the culture that I’m a part of, but my greatest challenge has been trying to find the balance between being a Sudanese woman and growing up in Australian society."

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Mandy

"The gender binary was challenged in a lot of ways unintentionally in my house..."

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Colleen

"When I entered the workforce, I became increasingly aware of the disparity between how women’s work is valued and how they are treated..."

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Jan

"...as I’ve got older, I’ve become more of a feminist. I’ve got that burning sense of injustice all the time."

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Kapambwe

"My mother (with the unconditional support of my father) sacrificed a lot so we could all get the best education."

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Jessamy

"‘Feminism’ was a dirty word when I was growing up."

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Lieu

“I left Vietnam when I was 14 to come to Australia. I came from a communist country, where the old folks say, ‘ten women equal to one man.’"

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Sophie

"It wasn’t until I went to uni that I was really introduced to feminism. I started to learn about all these different theories, and every week I was like, “That makes sense. That’s what the world’s like!” Then it came to feminist theory, and I was like, “Oh. My. God."

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Anthony

"My wife is a very strong role model for my three kids, who see a strong, independent woman as their mum."

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Alela

“I’ve probably been singing since before I could talk. I like alternative pop but also jazz and I’d love to be a singer/songwriter/actor when I grow up."

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Brodie

"If I had one message to give young women it would be to stop apologising and don’t diminish the things that you know."

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Karen

"I grew up in a small country town and I was very lucky to have parents who thought it was important and worthwhile for their daughter to get a tertiary education."

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